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Respiratory Care Week October 22nd - October 28th, 2017

October 22, 2017

Have you ever had a moment where you tell yourself to just breathe? Inhale…exhale…inhale…exhale.

 

Breathing is important to every one of us; Breathing gives us life! Breathing is important to me for reasons other than my own life, but for the lives of many others. I am currently attending Northern Kentucky University to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist. My life revolves around the respiratory system, lungs and breathing. Respiratory Therapists are known to be superheroes. We are out and about in all areas of hospitals, and take care of patients who need home care with diseases such as Asthma, COPD, Pneumonia, Cancer and Cystic Fibrosis. We help our patients to breathe easier, and educate them on how to take care of their respiratory system and bodies. Respiratory Therapists help patients breathe easier by doing breathing treatments (Inhalers, Nebulizers), breathing therapies (deep coughing, bronchial hygiene, lung therapies) and we also help patients who cannot breathe on their own. If you or someone that you love has been in the hospital, I can almost guarantee that you have seen a Respiratory Therapist.

 

 

 

 

October 22- October 28, 2017 is national “Respiratory Care Week” and provides the chance to recognize people of this profession and educate people on lung health. Respiratory Care week was established by the AARC (American Association of Respiratory Care) which was first established on July 13, 1946. Respiratory Care has come a long way since then, with the AARC stating, “Today respiratory care has evolved into a recognized profession with a body of knowledge, standards, unbelievable innovation, and a sophisticated structure” (AARC Virtual Museum, 2017).

 

 

 

Not only am I a student respiratory therapist, I also utilize my educational skills by working at Sweet Serenity Massage & Salt Therapy, which provides Halotherapy, or, “Salt Therapy”. Salt Therapy is a holistic way of healing for the respiratory system. Therapy consists of relaxing in a salt room, used to mimic a salt cave. 100% natural pharmaceutical salt is infused into the air by a generator, breaking the salt granules to smaller particles. Salt Room sessions last 45 minutes and are utilized for holistic healing for respiratory issues like Asthma, COPD, Smoker’s Cough, Cystic Fibrosis and Allergies/Sinus problems. Salt Therapy is widely popular in European countries and is gaining popularity in the US. Patients can find that Halotherapy helps them to breathe easier along with taking their daily medications. While there is research about the effects and uses of halotherapy which indicate patient’s medication uses decrease, more studies in the US are being developed.

 

 

 

Maybe you are on the fence about halotherapy…reading this and wondering, “Does this salt therapy really work?” I had the same notions about salt therapy. I was never taught this in my schooling, and I had never heard of this before. Is this safe, is this even a real thing? I went to Sweet Serenity Massage & Salt Therapy for an interview, to meet the owner, Fran Hasekoester, with no prior knowledge of salt therapy, and my life changed. I walked out of my interview with new education, new questions and my brain was filled with thoughts about Salt Therapy. So, I researched it and found many articles and studies done in the UK which made me even more fascinated. Could salt really help people breathe easier? From that point on, I was intrigued. My education grew; I was constantly researching about salt, not only for the respiratory system, but for the entire body. I encourage you all to do your own research and come to your own conclusions. Maybe Salt Therapy is what you have been missing from your allergy infused life. Now, I know you are asking, since I seem to have such a big belief that this works, have I even tried it for myself? The answer is yes. Once I stepped out of the salt room I was an even bigger believer than before. I experienced the salt room for the first time when I came down with a horrible cold, sore throat and my head felt like a balloon. It was the dreaded first fall cold. My head was about to pop at any time. My boss told me to come and try the salt room. This was the perfect time for me to see what the salt does for people who like me, had respiratory issues.